Thursday, December 20, 2012

Calendar Listings: Suffield Academy's Summer Programs


DATELINE: December 20, 2012
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACTS:

Maeve Ryan
Director of Marketing & Communications
Suffield Academy
860-386-4466
mryan@suffieldacademy.org

Mark G. Auerbach
Mark G. Auerbach Public Relations
413-733-7095 or 413-427-7352
mgauerbach@gmail.com

CALENDAR LISTINGS

SUFFIELD ACADEMY
SUMMER ACADEMY

June 30, 2013 through August 2, 2013

Suffield Academy
185 North Main St.
Suffield, MA 06078


The Summer Academy at Suffield Academy (June 30 - August 2, 2013) is a
five week, intensive co-educational program for day and boarding
students, ages 12 - 18. Course work offers individualized instruction
in study skills and leadership, academics (mathematics, languages,
ESL programs, computer science, and science); visual and performing
arts; athletics; cultural events and organized weekend outings to
Boston, New York City, and Newport.

Suffield Academy Summer Academy information, course descriptions,
tuition and fees, and application materials are online at
www.suffieldacademy.org.

For additional information on the Summer Program: contact Jeff
Depelteau, Summer Academy Director; telephone: 860-386-4445. Email:
jdepelteau@suffieldacademy.org

Suffield Academy, founded in 1833, is an independent, co-educational
college preparatory school for boarding and day students in Suffield,
CT.  Suffield Academy has a tradition of academic excellence combined
with a strong work ethic and leadership building programs. For
information on Suffield Academy’s programs and services:
www.suffieldacademy.org.

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Calendar Listings: Suffield Academy Summer Programs Information Session


DATELINE: December 20, 2012
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACTS:

Maeve Ryan
Director of Marketing & Communications
Suffield Academy
860-386-4466
mryan@suffieldacademy.org

Mark G. Auerbach
Mark G. Auerbach Public Relations
413-733-7095 or 413-427-7352
mgauerbach@gmail.com

CALENDAR LISTINGS

SUFFIELD ACADEMY
SUMMER PROGRAMS
INFORMATION SESSION


Wednesday, February 6, 2013 at 7:30PM

Fuller Hall
Suffield Academy
185 North Main St.
Suffield, MA 06078


Suffield Academy holds an evening informational session for parents
and students interested in the Summer Academy program, on Wednesday,
February 6, 2013 at 7:30PM. The information session will be hosted by
Jeff Depelteau, Summer Academy Director of Admissions.  Admission is
free, but advance reservations are required by Monday, February 4,
2013. To RSVP, contact Jeff Depelteau at 860-386-4445 or
jdepelteau@suffieldacademy.org.

The Summer Academy at Suffield Academy (June 30 - August 2, 2013) is a
five week, intensive co-educational program for day and boarding
students, ages 12 - 18. Course work offers individualized instruction
in study skills and leadership, academics (mathematics, languages,
ESL programs, computer science, and science); visual and performing
arts; athletics; cultural events and organized weekend outings to
Boston, New York City, and Newport.

Suffield Academy Summer Academy information, course descriptions,
tuition and fees, and application materials are online at
www.suffieldacademy.org.

For additional information on the Summer Program: contact Jeff
Depelteau, Summer Academy Director; telephone: 860-386-4445. Email:
jdepelteau@suffieldacademy.org

Suffield Academy, founded in 1833, is an independent, co-educational
college preparatory school for boarding and day students in Suffield,
CT.  Suffield Academy has a tradition of academic excellence combined
with a strong work ethic and leadership building programs. For
information on Suffield Academy’s programs and services:
www.suffieldacademy.org.

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Two Vermont Journal Features about Kurn Hattin




Save The Date: The 2013 Big Broadcast



Save the dates !

The Jazz Ensembles of Mount Holyoke College
present
THE BIG BROADCAST

Sunday, March 10, 2013
2PM and 7PM
Chapin Auditorium
Mount Holyoke College
South Hadley, MA 01075

A recreation of a live 1940’s radio broadcast directed by Mark
Gionfriddo with WWLP-TV meterologist Brian Lapis as emcee. Under
Gionfriddo’s direction, the Mount Holyoke Big Band, Vocal Jazz, and
Chamber Jazz Ensembles perform well-known tunes from the swing era.

Sponsors to date include: Mount Holyoke College, The Republican/Mass
Live, New England Public Radio, WWLP-TV22, Loomis Communities.

Tickets (on sale 1/11/13) are general admission. $20.00 premium front
and center seating. $15.00 regular seating. $10.00 seniors and
students. Tickets available at Odyssey Bookshop, Village Commons, and
The Northampton Box-Office. 


Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Victor Acquista MD Article in The Westfield News

The following article appeared in the 12/10/12 edition of The Westfield News.


Health Wise
A health & wellness column by Victor Acquista, MD 
Director Pathways Integral Health & Wellness, LLC; Author Pathways to Health: An Integral Guidebook

Get Motivated, Stay Motivated

Recently, I wrote a column on Lifestyle and Health and commented that much of chronic disease is related to lifestyle choices. Making decisions and keeping them with respect to lifestyle choices that affect health often comes down to motivation and sustaining that motivation which is all about discipline. This column will address some ideas and offer you some suggestions about how to get motivated and stay motivated to be healthier.

Understanding Decisions

A good place for us to start is understanding how we go about making decisions. In a very simplified way, we have two parts of our brain informing us about what we should and should not do. The emotional part of our brain is often decisive in controlling out decision making. We have needs and desires; we make decisions to satisfy those needs and desires. Some decisions make us happy, others make us sad, or angry. The decisions leave us feeling satisfied or not. This is all based on emotion and emotional fulfillment. If I desire chocolate and eating chocolate is the only way to feel better, then chances are I’ll go eat some chocolate regardless of the long term consequences. Such a choice is based on short term emotional decision making. This part of our brain can often be impulsive.
Contrast this to the other decision making center of our brain, i.e. the rational brain. That’s the part of our brain that uses logic and weighs out the pros and the cons of alternatives. Our rational self is not concerned about emotions and remains cool, calm and collected when figuring out the best choice. This part of our brain is much better at weighing out the long and the short term consequences of our actions.
When the emotional part of our brain and the rational part of our brain are both aligned then decision making is easy. It’s kind of a no brainer to make a choice that is supported by both brain decision centers as it represents a win-win situation. But what happens when the emotional and rational parts of our brain want different things? In the case above, what happens when emotional you wants chocolate and rational you says that will cause weight gain or be bad for my diabetes? This kind of conflict is common. Poets and philosophers have referred to this as the war between passion and reason. When it comes to health, how do you make healthy lifestyle choices when part of you is “arguing” to do something which is unhealthy. Eating a calorie rich dessert when you are trying to lose weight because at the moment you are more concerned about enjoying dessert than losing weight is a good example. Sitting down and watching TV because you are tired and want to rest instead of heading out to the gym or going for a walk is another good example. Here I have illustrated the conflict around common health choices about diet and exercise. I am sure you can relate to these examples.

Good news—there is a third part of the brain that helps to mediate this conflict between the emotional and rational parts of our brains. This is the volitional brain, the seat of our willpower. Think of the volitional brain as a referee who helps you to decide what choice you will make.

Understanding Motivation

We are all motivated by a set of internal and external factors. These are individualized, but are best understood by examples. I may be motivated to lose weight because I understand that my current weight is unhealthy and puts me at risk for diabetes and high blood pressure (a rational argument). Or, I may be motivated to lose weight because I don’t like the way I look (an emotional argument). In both cases, these are internal motivators. 

You might be motivated to stop smoking for some very good internal reasons such as its bad for my health or it costs a lot of money. But you might also have some good external motivators such as, I promised my spouse that I would quit and I don’t want to disappoint him/her. Or, I want to set a good example for my children. In either case, these represent external motivations. You might consider not wanting to be late for work because I might get in trouble as a prototypic example of an external motivator. How about, I want to stop drinking because if I am caught operating a vehicle, I might lose my license and land in jail. That represents pretty strong external motivation not to drink!

I like to encourage people to think of motivators in terms of rewards and punishments which both represent reinforcers. Things which reward you represent a source of positive reinforcement, while things which punish you represent types of negative reinforcement. These reinforcers are the carrot and the stick which often underlie our motivation. 

Bringing it all home

One very useful exercise is to sit down and list the health behaviors you would like to adopt or change and then to detail the internal and external motivators which support your decision making. Study the list and see if you can develop some reinforcers to support you. Think in terms of internal and external motivators as well as positive and negative reinforcers. For example, if you want to lose weight, you can reward yourself with a new outfit after losing 10 pounds. Or, if you want to exercise more often, enroll a friend to be your gym buddy who can encourage you when your motivation fails. 

And your motivation will fail from time to time. No matter how committed you are to a particular health choice, you may slip up from time to time. Having a plan in advance on how to deal with temptation is advisable. Have a health sponsor that you can call when you are feeling weak. Put a picture of your children or loved ones in your wallet and look at the picture when you are thinking of breaking a health promise. Bring out the list you made and review it every day. Post it on your refrigerator or on the mirror to look at when you are washing, shaving, or brushing your teeth.

Having good intentions about your health is a good starting point, but keeping them is all about sustained motivation and discipline. Perseverance or stick-to-it-tiveness will be the challenge. That’s where your volitional brain will ultimately decide your success.
As we approach the New Year, think of your New Year’s resolutions as your good intentions. Understand the source of your motivation to achieve your health goals. Follow through by being resolute and maintaining your willpower. Like the Nike commercial says, “Just do it!”

Be healthy…

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Monday, December 10, 2012

Mark G. Auerbach Public Relations: 2012: The Year In Review



Mark G. Auerbach (At Work)

Bottom line: We like to brag about our clients...not what we’ve helped them to accomplish, but what they’ve accomplished.

2012 was a transitional year for us. We partnered with some new clients. We introduced social media counsel into our mix. We were able to hire a part-time account executive.  Thanks to Bill Eagan, a colleague with a strong background in non-profit marketing and videography for agreeing to work with me.

A note of satisfaction: This summer, I celebrated the 25th anniversary of Mark G. Auerbach Public Relations.

So, on to the bragging. And, thanks to our clients, our purveyors, our vendors, and our colleagues for a good year.

Berkshire Film and Media Commission, Great Barrington, MA  (pro-bono). 

Massachusetts offers filmmakers a tax credit when they film a movie, video, commercial or some other project in the Baystate. The Berkshire Film and Media Commission has been working to bring filmmakers to the Berkshires. We’re helping them expand their services to all of Western Massachusetts. berkshirefilm.org/

The Collaborative for Community Health, Palmer, MA 

Victor Acquista, MD, a client, is a co-founder of this non-profit which provides a variety of health-related programs and services to the area. We helped them market two community health markets in September and October in Wilbraham, MA. thecollaborativeforcommunityhealth.org/

The David Pakman Show, Northampton/Greenfield, MA

Since we began working with David Pakman, his internationally-syndicated progressive talk program has expanded to four new programs a week. The David Pakman Show, available on radio, television, satellite, the web and more makes headlines for Pakman’s interviews. He’s added a syndicated monthly newspaper column.  davidpakman.com/

Jazz Ensembles at Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA

Mount Holyoke College’s instrumental and vocal jazz programs get rave reviews, and faculty member Mark Gionfriddo has replicated the radio variety program of the 1930s and 1940s as “The Big Broadcast”, a fully-staged musical entertainment. In recent years, Gionfriddo directs and conducts with WWLP-TV weather guy Brian Lapis, himself a devotee and product of radio, as Emcee. The 2013 shows are on Sunday, March 10, 2013.  Some examples:

Kurn Hattin Homes, Westminster, VT

In partnership with Rapt Creative of Brattleboro, VT, we’re working on a three-year awareness campaign for Kurn Hattin Homes, a unique non-profit boarding school for children elementary school age through 8th grade, who come from extraordinary circumstances. Kurn Hattin provides them with a living and learning experience that helps them move forward. One recent alum, Lyssa Jackson, gave back by launching a fundraiser honored by the Association of Fund Raising Professionals on Northern New England. Her story was videotaped. Other stories are at www.kurnhattin.org.


The Mike Thornton Agency / The Capitol Steps

For over 10 years, I’ve worked with Mike Thornton, a member of The Capitol Steps, to produce and/or promote their shows in The Pioneer Valley, MA as benefits for public radio, and in other markets. We partnered in 2012 promoting two performances of “The Capitol Steps: The 2012 Winners and Losers Edition” in Cambridge, MA at Harvard’s Sanders Theatre. http://www.capsteps.com/


Northfield Mount Hermon School, Gill, MA (pro-bono)

I’m a proud alum of NMH, and I’ll provide whatever resources are needed to help my alma mater. I’m serving as my Class Secretary, a member of its Reunion Committee, and contributor to the NMH Magazine as Class Notes columnist; I administer my class Facebook page, a LGBT alumni page, and I provide Facebook support to other pages. nmhschool.org

Pathways Integral Health and Wellness, Silver City, NM

Victor Acquista MD, my former doctor, founded an integral health and wellness web-based community, as he published his first book, “Pathways to Health: An Integral Guidebook”. We’ve helped him market and promote the e-book, and we’ve helped him expand the network for his “Health Wise” columns, which are now carried in The Westfield (MA) News, and Prime Magazine. http://pathstohealth.info/


Suffield Academy, Suffield, CT

Suffield Academy, a distinguished New England college preparatory school, has an innovative summer academy offering a variety of enrichment progtrams for students 12+. We’re assisting them build awareness for the program in Western Massachusetts and Northern Connecticut. www.suffieldacademy.org.

Here on my blog, you can find additional information on what my clients are accomplishing on an on-going basis.

If you’re on Facebook, you can follow my clients here: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mark-G-Auerbach-Public-Relations/114375215268513

Season’s Greetings and all best wishes for a happy and healthy New Year.

Friday, December 7, 2012

Victor Acquista MD Article on Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes

Client Victor Acquista's syndicated article on Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes ran in the Westfield News on December 4, 2012

This article, and others by Dr. Acquista, can be viewed online. The Westfield News website charges to access these articles.  http://thewestfieldnews.com/health-wise-therapeutic-lifestyle-changes




Health Wise

8 Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes That Can Change Your Life


Last year a thoroughly researched and rather important paper was published in American Psychologist by an eminent physician, Dr. Roger Walsh. The topic was on Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes (TLC) and the paper summarized research on eight different lifestyle choices that can improve your health. Normally, when we think of TLC, we think of “Tender Loving Care” and that is pretty much what Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes represent—TLC are how we can show ourselves some TLC. In this two-part article, we’ll look at these eight lifestyle choices as a means to empower our ability to self manage our health and well-being.

First off we should recognize that many chronic diseases including cardiovascular disorders, diabetes, obesity, and cancers are frequently determined by lifestyle. Dietary choices, the level of physical activity (or inactivity), smoking, and alcohol intake are all major contributing factors in our individual and collective health. Just as poor choices can be detrimental to our health, good choices can be beneficial. Collectively, TLC can improve physical health, mental health, self esteem, and quality of life.

Exercise

Exercise can help condition your body and your mind. It reduces the risk of heart disease, diabetes, and even prostate cancer. Done properly, it can be good for arthritis. It helps build and maintain muscle mass which is particularly important as we get older. Exercise can be a good stress reducer and can be helpful in both preventing and treating both anxiety and depression.

Other potential benefits of exercise include improved sleep, increase in brain volume, and improved cognition. Some of these cognitive benefits might surprise you—better academic performance, reduction in age related memory loss, enhanced stroke recovery, and as a valuable therapy for Alzheimer’s patients. Clearly exercise is good for the body and the brain.

So what are you waiting for? Like the Nike ad says, “Just do it!”  As always, before starting an exercise regime, it’s best to check with your health provider for guidance.

Nutrition and Diet

There is quite a bit of nutritional guidance out there and sometimes it can be overwhelming. I like to keep it simple so I emphasize the 5 F’s:

Fat—eat less fat
Fiber—eat more fiber
Fruits and vegetables—eat more fruits and vegetables
Fish—eat more fish
Folic acid—eat more folic acid if you are a woman of child bearing age as this helps prevent certain types of birth defects

Of course, controlling your caloric intake is crucial as this helps prevent obesity. Obesity is associated with heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, certain cancers, and degenerative joint disease. A pescovegetarian diet is associated with many of the same neuroprotective and cognitive benefits described previously for exercise. We know that fish oil is good for mental health and has beneficial anti-inflammatory properties.

Nature

Spending time in nature might seem like an unusual health and wellness recommendation, but it has been recognized for thousands of years that nature can both heal and calm. Too much time in unnatural artificial environments can disrupt biorhythms and sleep cycle. Exposure to sunlight is important for vitamin D synthesis. Vitamin D is essential for bone health and also has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with bone fractures, cognitive impairment, and several mental disorders.

Dr. Walsh details some of the health benefits of natural settings: enhanced cognitive, attentional, emotional, spiritual, and subjective well being. Although more research is needed in this area, studies suggest immersion in nature appears to reduce stress, depression, and ADHD.

Relationships

In many respects, the quality of our relationships mirrors the quality of our lives. It has been my own observation as a primary care physician that people with good relationships tend to enjoy better health. Because I believe this is an underappreciated area of health, I covered this as a separate chapter in my book, Pathways to Health—An Integral Guidebook.

Recognize that we are social beings. Having the support and caring of close friends, family, and community is important to our overall health and well being. Having toxic and/or broken relationships can be very stressful and we know that stress is associated with poor mental and physical health. Having few or no relationships leaves us open to isolation and depression. Our choices in making, maintaining, breaking and repairing relationships are important to our individual and collective well-being.

Part Two of this series on Therapeutic Lifestyle Choices (TLC) will cover: Recreation and Enjoyable Activities, Relaxation and Stress Management, Religious and Spiritual Involvement, and Contribution and Service.



8 Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes That Can Change Your Life

In Part One of the two-part column I summarized some of the work published recently by Dr. Roger Walsh and incorporated some of my own ideas on Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes (TLC). Collectively, these represent important choices we make that impact our health. In Part One we covered the first four topics: Exercise, Nutrition and Diet, Nature, and Relationships. Let’s turn our attention to the remaining four topics.

Recreation and Enjoyable Activities 

Recreation is just one of the ways we re-create ourselves and mange to restore and renew. When you are involved with enjoyable activities, hobbies, creative pursuits, etc. you are engaged and focused on these pursuits. You stop thinking about the things that are worrying you and draining your energy. This is healthy. We all need the down time to recharge. Quoting directly from Dr. Walsh, “Recreation may overlap with, and therefore confer the benefits of, other TLCs such as exercise, time in nature, and social interactions.

Think about and take inventory of how you relax, how you play, what you do to have fun, and how you spend enjoyable time with others. Time spent with these kinds of experiences is healthy for our minds, psyche, spirit, and socially. Depending on the activity, there may be physical benefits as well. Don’t overlook this important aspect of your health and well-being.

Relaxation and Stress Management 

Certainly there is some overlap when discussing relaxation and stress as many of the ways we de-stress and relax are the very things we do to re-create and spend time with enjoyable pursuits. But when we think about the health effects of chronic stress, we need to consider the release of “stress hormones” and how these can result in physical and mental effects. Too much stress elevates our blood pressure, affects our sleep, our relationships, and generally runs us down.

Meditation is a great way to relax and relieve stress. Regular exercise, hobbies and past time pursuits, social engagement are all ways to reduce stress. Movement practices such as tai chi and qui gong have both physical and psychological benefits and are excellent ways to de-stress. Of course, many people try to de-stress through unhealthy means. These include: addictions, abuse of prescription and non-prescription substances, alcohol, tobacco, violence and aggression. There are many healthy TLC to select from instead of making these types of unhealthy choices.

Religious and Spiritual Involvement

It might seem unusual to discuss religion and spirituality in the context of health. Yet, 90% of the world’s population engages in religious or spiritual practices. Often, religion and spirituality are partly how we contend with stress and illness. Did you know that the word “health” shares the same roots as the word “holy”? Research has demonstrated a beneficial relationship between religious involvement and mental health. Potential benefits include less anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and suicide.

One can conceptualize religion and spirituality as how we relate to the divine. We know that good relationships favorably impact our health and our sense of well being. When we recognize that spirituality is an important aspect of who we are and embrace that as an important aspect of health, it opens up a new door of understanding. Prayer has been shown to have health benefits. Connecting with nature is potentially one of the ways we relate to the divine. Being part of a religious community is a way to feel connected and part of a support network and represents another way we can improve our health.

Contribution and Service

This is one of my favorite TLC to discuss because it is so often overlooked. Contributing to a cause greater than ourselves expands our circle of involvement. Volunteerism is just one way to contribute to the greater health of our society. And, studies of people who volunteer suggest that they are psychologically and physically healthier. As Dr. Walsh states, “…service is not necessarily a sacrifice but rather can foster qualities that serve the giver—such as happiness, mental health, and spiritual maturity. Altruism is said to reduce unhealthy mental qualities such as greed, jealousy, and egocentricity while enhancing healthy qualities such as love, joy, and generosity.”

Beyond individual health, there is a multiplier effect from getting involved in service and by contributing to society. This is one way to build “social capital” and contribute to the health and well being of society as a whole. Indeed, the word “health” also shares roots with the word “whole”. In this sense, to be healthy is to be whole and it is more difficult to be healthy in a society that is not. Contributing and providing service provides healing to self and our larger society.


This two-part article covered quite a bit of ground discussing therapeutic lifestyle changes which can be life changing and bring you to a place of better health and well-being. The eight specific areas include:  Exercise, Nutrition and Diet, Nature, Relationships, Recreation and Enjoyable Activities, Relaxation and Stress Management, Religious and Spiritual Involvement, and Contribution and Service. Read more in Dr. Walsh’s publication, Lifestyle and Mental Health and in my book, Pathways to Health—An Integral Guidebook.

Stay Healthy!

Media Advisory: Holiday Events at Kurn Hattin Homes



DATELINE: December 7, 2012
Holiday Happenings at Kurn Hattin Homes for Children

Monday, Dec. 10 – Wednesday, Dec. 12,  All Day – Farm Week – Holiday Pine Crafts

Children will be making holiday wreaths and pine table d├ęcor.

Wednesday, Dec. 12, 3:00 PM –  Boys’ Haircuts
A time-honored tradition at Kurn Hattin (and a great photo op! )  Former Kurn Hattin houseparent Laura Carroll gathers the boys in groups, and everybody gets a haircut. 

Thursday, Dec. 13, 12:30 PM  – Christmas Visitors’ Day  
Donors and member of organizations who support Kurn Hattin are invited to campus for a special  "thank you" from the children and staff -- a holiday luncheon and holiday performances from the jazz band and choir.

Thursday, Dec. 13,  3:00 PM Chester Rotary Santa and Elves Visit the CottagesSanta, Mrs. Claus, their elves, and other surprise guests—volunteers from the Chester Rotary Club—visit each residential cottage on campus, singing carols and delivering a gift for each Kurn Hattin child.


Credentialed media may visit Kurn Hattin to photograph the events. Media must call in advance and reserve a spot with  
Jaimie Scanlon, Rapt Creative, at jaimie@raptcreative.com or 802-490-2164.

Kurn Hattin Homes for children is a charitable home and school for boys and girls, ages 6-15, who are affected by tragedy, social or economic hardship, or other disruption in family life. Its mission: Kurn Hattin transforms the lives of children and their families forever. www./kurnhattin.org

###

Kurn Hattin Announces New Board Chair and Leadership


Some community leaders have joined the Board at Kurn Hattin Homes.

http://www.ibrattleboro.com/article.php/20121204112753902

Thursday, November 29, 2012

More on Kurn Hattin Graduate Lyssa Jackson

On this tribute by her other alma mater, Putney School...

There's a film about Lyssa Jackson that was shown at the AFP Awards ceremony in Stowe.

http://www.putneyschool.org/content/lyssa-jackson-12-wins-fundraising-award

Monday, November 26, 2012

Victor Acquista MD, PRIME Column, 12/12


Client Victor Acquista, MD's column about Falls in the December 2012 edition of PRIME Magazine.

http://www.primeontheweb.com/primehealth/fallstipsforpreven/

Sunday, November 25, 2012


For those of you who have been following my postings about Kurn Hattin Homes, particularly those about Lyssa Jackson, the KHH grad who raised money for her school and got a philanthropy award...

Steve Gilbert of the Keene Sentinel profiled Lyssa in a front page feature.

http://www.sentinelsource.com/opinion/columnists/staff/gilbert/free-to-be-a-child/article_32079005-d0ba-5910-804e-7cd98bc3f133.html

This is the spirit of Thanksgiving and philanthropy at its best.

Friday, November 23, 2012

Thursday, November 22, 2012

The Capitol Steps / Weekend Pick in the Boston Globe


Tickets for the Capitol Steps "Winners and Losers Edition" available for both performances on Saturday.

http://www.boston.com/thingstodo/gotoit/2012/11/weekend_picks_n.html

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Good Press for The David Pakman Show


I'm pleased to see my client, the David Pakman Show, getting good press for some of its excellent programming and interviews. http://www.davidpakman.com/press-news/

Kurn Hattin Choir Audition Video


A recent video of the Kurn Hattin Choir, made for an audition. The perform with Natalie MacMaster on November 29 at the Bellows Falls Opera House (VT) in "A Cape Breton Christmas". http://kurnhattin.vidcaster.com/YAK3/kurn-hattin-ill-fly-away/

Monday, November 19, 2012

Media Release: Kurn Hattin Choir to Perform with Natalie MacMaster at Bellows Falls Opera House



DATELINE: November 19, 2012
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


Contacts:
Jaimie Scanlon
Rapt Creative
(W) 
802-490-2164 (C) 802-579-8545
jaimie@raptcreative.com

Mark G. Auerbach
Mark G. Auerbach Public Relations
(W) 
413-733-7095 (C) 413-427-7352
mgauerbach@gmail.com


KURN HATTIN CHILDREN’S CHOIR JOINS GRAMMY WINNER NATALIE MACMASTER ON STAGE IN BELLOWS FALLS NOVEMBER 29

Forty members of the Kurn Hattin Homes Children’s Choir have been invited to join Grammy Award winning fiddler Natalie MacMaster in her “Christmas in Cape Breton” concert at the Bellows Falls Opera House on Thursday, November 29 at 7PM.
Concert producer Jay Craven of Kingdom County Productions selected Kurn Hattin’s choir to perform several holiday songs with MacMaster, whose North American tour includes performances from local children’s choirs. “During this holiday season, the addition of the Kurn Hattin Children’s Choir reminds of the artistic riches available in our own communities, the vitality of young people, and the importance of helping others,” says Craven. The Kurn Hattin Children's choir, directed by Lisa Bianconi, performs regularly throughout the northeast.

For information on Natalie MacMaster: 
http://www.nataliemacmaster.com/

For information on the Bellows Falls Opera House:
http://www.bfoperahouse.com/site/

For information on Kingdom County Productions:

Tickets for Natalie MacMaster’s“Christmas in Cape Breton” are available by phone at 802-748-2600; online at KingdomCounty.org and at the following locations: Village Square Booksellers, Bellows Falls or Misty Valley Books, Chester.  Information is also available by contacting Kingdom County series producer Jay Craven (jcraven@marlboro.edu).

The Natalie MacMaster concert is presented in Bellows Falls by Kingdom County Productions, with generous sponsorship support from Rockingham Arts and Museum Project (RAMP), Vermont Festivals, Popolo Restaurant, and Vermont Public Radio.

Established in 1894, Kurn Hattin Homes for Children in Westminster, Vermont is a charitable home and school for boys and girls, ages 6-15, who are affected by tragedy, social or economic hardship, or other disruption in family life. Its mission: Kurn Hattin transforms the lives of children and their families forever.
www.kurnhattin.org.
*                   

Sunday, November 18, 2012

We Like to Brag About Our Clients

Here's some of our clients' upcoming activities as we move towards the holiday season.


Ongoing: The David Pakman Show. The internationally syndicated progressive political talk radio and TV show. Client: The David Pakman Show  http://www.davidpakman.com/

Ongoing: Pathways to Health, an integral health community  founded by Victor Acquista, MD, author of “Pathways to Health: An Integral Guidebook”.  (Available at http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007XY2ZRW/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=01tkcom-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B007XY2ZRW). Client: Victor Acquista, MD http://pathstohealth.info/

SAT: 11/24: The Capitol Steps perform “The 2012 Winners and Losers Edition” at Sanders Theatre, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. Performances are 5PM & 8PM. Produced by our Client: The Mike Thornton Agency. Tickets: Harvard Box-Office: . http://ofa.fas.harvard.edu/boxoffice/

THU: 11/29: The Kurn Hattin Homes Children’s Choir performs with Natalie MacMaster in “Christmas in Cape Breton, at the Bellows Falls Opera House in Bellows Falls, VT. Client: Kurn Hattin Homes/ Rapt Creative. Tickets: by phone at 802-748-2600; online at KingdomCounty.org and at the following locations: Village Square Booksellers, Bellows Falls or Misty Valley Books, Chester. For information on Kurn Hattin Homes: www.kurnhattin.org

SUN: 3/10/13: The Big Broadcast. Client: The Jazz Ensembles of Mount Holyoke College present their annual recreation of a 1940’s radio show with period music, commercials, skits, and songs. Chapin Auditorium, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA. 2PM & 7PM Tickets go one sale after January 1, 2013.

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Victor Acquista MD's latest article: Getting a Good Night's Sleep

The following ran in the 11/12/12 issue of The Westfield News. The paper's website has a paywall.


Health Wise

A health & wellness column by Victor Acquista, MD, Director Pathways Integral Health & Wellness, LLC; Author Pathways to Health: An Integral Guidebook http://www.facebook.com/PathwaysIntegralHealthAndWellness

Getting a Good Nights Sleep

Many people have difficulty falling asleep, sleeping through the night, or getting a restful sleep. Many folks rely on prescription or non-prescription medications or herbs to help overcome their sleep difficulties. In general, I am not a fan of medications or herbs to be used in this manner; although, I do see a place for them. The basics of good sleep hygiene should be recommended as a starting point for anyone having trouble with insomnia.

In this column, I shall focus on habits and environmental factors that should be evaluated when you or a loved one are having sleep difficulties. I shall not cover medical conditions which can interrupt sleep. Conditions such as sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome, or nocturia (getting up at night to urinate) should be evaluated by a medical professional as part of a strategy to improve sleep. A review of medications and non-prescription supplements should also be considered as many might have stimulants or can be activating in ways that affect sleep.

Habits

The body has a natural cycle which we refer to as a circadian rhythm. Having different schedules and erratic sleep wake cycles is disruptive to the body’s natural rhythm. A good place to start if you are having difficulty sleeping is to try and get on a regular schedule. To the extent possible, this cycle should correspond to the day-night cycle. Our bodies are naturally set to be awake during daylight and asleep at night.

Regular exercise is a good habit for many health reasons. When we are physically tired, it’s easier to sleep. However, it is not a good idea to exercise and then try and sleep. Exercise revs us up and it takes time to settle back down. In general, it is not a good idea to eat before bedtime. Among other reasons, going to bed with a full stomach tends to promote reflux of acid contents (GERD) which can interfere with sleep as well as damage the esophagus. Many people are sensitive to caffeine and caffeine like substances which are contained in foods such as chocolate and may be present in other consumables such as sports/energy drinks and diet aids. If you are having trouble sleeping it’s a good idea to avoid these. Similarly, alcohol and tobacco are generally things you should avoid if a good nights sleep is something elusive for you.

Environment

Although some of these might seem obvious, it’s a good idea to take stock of your sleeping environment focusing on sights, sounds, and comfort. Many people are sensitive to light. Even dim light can trigger an awake response in the brain and prevent sleep. In particular, blue light can be more stimulating.  Try to eliminate or cover light emitting diodes (LEDs) on your electric devices visible from your bed. If outside streetlights, flood lights or other sources of illumination are present, try to use shades or blinds to reduce the indoor lighting. You can also try night shades or patches to cover your eyes provided these do not feel too uncomfortable. Since it can be dangerous to get out of bed in a totally dark environment, have a bedside night light or flashlight available should you need to get up.

Sounds and noises can interfere with sleep. Try to reduce any noises such as ticking clocks, buzzing sounds, etc. Foam earplugs are effective and generally comfortable and can block annoying sounds. Some sounds may aide sleep such as white noise. There are inexpensive white noise generators and other devices (such as the sound of ocean waves) which may provide a better nighttime acoustic environment as-well-as block out other interfering noises.

Take stock of your mattress, blanket, and pillow. If any of these are uncomfortable they can interfere with your sleep. Many people sleep better with some weight over them as in a snug blanket. We can speculate that this feels more secure. However, some people can only tolerate a light covering. Temperature is another factor to consider and is highly individualized. If you are too hot or too cold you will not be in a comfortable sleep environment. Also consider your sleep attire and assess whether or not it is comfortable. Ventilation is another consideration. If a fan or vent is blowing on you, this can make sleep difficult. A stuffy room might also create sleep difficulties. Consider all of these environmental factors if you are experiencing trouble sleeping.

Other considerations

Many people lie in bed craving sleep while they review the troubling circumstances of their life or things that happened earlier that day. Many people lay awake thinking about what they need to do tomorrow as in the tasks, the work deadlines, responsibilities, etc. When the mind is engaged in worries, anxieties, angers, frustrations or even engaged reviewing happy and exciting things that have happened or are anticipated it makes it hard to calm down and get some rest. If mental chatter is keeping you awake, try some focusing mental techniques to help calm and quiet the mind. This can be as simple as deep breathing, especially abdominal breathing as this has a calming effect. Try focusing first on your feet and appreciate the sensations in your feet, then gradually work your way up your body thinking all the while about relaxing tight muscles. Even counting sheep is an age old trick to help reduce mental chatter and allow you to get to sleep.

Better habits to improve your sleep hygiene and more attention to environmental factors to reduce stimulation and increase comfort may go a long way in helping you achieve a restful sleep. Some simple focusing techniques to help calm your mind might also be helpful. If you continue to suffer from insomnia, check with your medical provider for more guidance.

Pleasant dreams!

Kurn Hattin Young Philanthropist Makes Headlines


Lyssa Jackson mentioned in Your Olive Branch. Front page story too.
http://news.yourolivebranch.org/2012/11/13/kurn-hattin-graduate-wins-outstanding-youth-in-philanthropy-award/

Monday, November 12, 2012

Media Release: Kurn Hattin Grad Wins Youth in Philanthropy Award



DATELINE: November 12, 2012
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contacts:
Jaimie Scanlon
Rapt Creative
(W) 
802-490-2164 (C) 802-579-8545
jaimie@raptcreative.com

Mark G. Auerbach
Mark G. Auerbach Public Relations
(W) 
413-733-7095 (C) 413-427-7352
mgauerbach@gmail.com


Graduate of Kurn Hattin Homes for Children Wins Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy Award.
Awards Ceremony in Stowe, November 15th.

Lyssa Jackson, a graduate of Kurn Hattin Homes for Children in Westminster, Vt., has been awarded the 2012 Award for Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy by the Association of Fundraising Professionals’ Northern New England Chapter (AFP-NNE).

The award is given annually to an individual, ages 10–23, who has demonstrated outstanding commitment to the community through direct financial support, development of charitable programs, volunteering and leadership in philanthropy.

Jackson, currently a student at Skidmore College, will accept the award at a special luncheon during the AFP-NNE Conference at the Stoweflake Mountain Resort in Stowe, VT.  The event will take place on November 15th, 2021—National Philanthropy Day—and will be attended by more than 200 fundraising professionals from Vermont, Maine, and New Hampshire.

Biography
Having faced numerous adult-sized challenges during her early childhood, including the death of her father at a young age and coping with her mother’s mental illness, Lyssa was placed in the care of her grandmother at age 10. When her mother’s illness became more severe, the family chose to send Lyssa to attend school at Kurn Hattin Homes for Children, in Westminster, Vermont, a charitable home and school for children in need from throughout the northeast. The organization runs entirely on charitable donations. Lyssa graduated from Kurn Hattin Homes for Children in 2008 and then received a full scholarship to attend the Putney School.

Philanthropy Project
Last year, while a senior at the Putney School, Lyssa mobilized her fellow students to raise over $5,000 for Kurn Hattin Homes for Children, so she could give back to the place that she felt gave her a chance in life. “I can never fully repay Kurn Hattin for what they gave me, because what they gave me goes beyond value,” she reflected, “Kurn Hattin didn’t turn me into the person I am, but it allowed me to become the person I knew I could be.
As part of the Putney School’s 2nd Annual Community Workday, students performed manual labor tasks for residents in the community, with the proceeds going to a selected charity. Putney School students chose Kurn Hattin Homes for Children last year after a heartfelt presentation from Lyssa. She told of her hardship as a child and how a home for children just down the road helped her become who she is today.  Her classmates voted in her favor to not only support Kurn Hattin but also to support Lyssa, their friend and classmate. At the end of just one full day of hard work in the community, the group had raised $5,316 for Kurn Hattin. 

About Kurn Hattin Homes for Children
Established in 1894, Kurn Hattin Homes for Children in Westminster, Vermont is a charitable home and school for boys and girls, ages 6-15, who are affected by tragedy, social or economic hardship, or other disruption in family life. Its mission: Kurn Hattin transforms the lives of children and their families forever. www.kurnhattin.org.

About AFP NNE
AFP of Northern New England is comprised of 230+ members from the states of New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine. The chapter organizes an annual conference every November (which rotates among the three states) and offers professional development, educational and networking opportunities to its members in all three states. The conference includes the awards ceremony, which honors individuals and groups for their outstanding philanthropic endeavors.


Credentialed media may request interviews with Ms. Jackson. If interested in attending the November 15th awards event in Stowe, media must call in advance and reserve a spot with: Jaimie Scanlon, Rapt Creative, atjaimie@raptcreative.com (mailto:jaimie@raptcreative.com) or 802-490-2164
(tel:802-490-2164).
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Sunday, November 11, 2012

Victor Acquista MD's "Pathways To Health" Discounted for Holiday Giving


Client Victor Acquista MD's book "Pathways to Health" price-reduced for the holidays. A great gift for you and your friends. http://www.amazon.com/Pathways-Health-Integral-Guidebook-ebook/dp/B007XY2ZRW

Hospital Serenade

The Kurn Hattin singers serenaded the school's executive director, as he recovers from surgery.

http://epaper.bostonglobe.com/epaper/viewer.aspx

Monday, November 5, 2012

Media Advisory: Kurn Hattin Veteran's Day Celebration


November 5, 2012
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contacts:
Jaimie Scanlon
Rapt Creative
(W) 802-490-2164 (C) 802-579-8545
jaimie@raptcreative.com

MEDIA ADVISORY: PHOTO OPPORTUNITY

KURN HATTIN CHILDREN TO HONOR VETERANS

November 12, 2012
Kurn Hattin Homes for Children, Westminster, VT


Kurn Hattin Homes for Children in Westminster, Vt. will hold a special event in observance of Veteran's Day on Monday, November 12th. The Kurn Hattin children, coordinated by social studies teacher, Richard Long, will honor veterans with a full program of activities, including a Presentation  and Call to Colors, poetry and essay readings, and musical performances by the Kurn Hattin choir and band.

In addition, students will hold a candle lighting ceremony accompanied by a reading of the names of Vermont soldiers who have lost their lives in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Several guest speakers from the local community, including current military personnel, will round out the program, and the event will conclude with a special luncheon.

This event is open to the public. PLEASE NOTE: Limited public seating available. Please call Heather Longe at 802 721-6916 to RSVP.

Kurn Hattin Homes for children is a charitable home and school for boys and girls, ages 6-15, who are affected by tragedy, social or economic hardship, or other disruption in family life. Its mission: Kurn Hattin transforms the lives of children and their families forever. www./kurnhattin.org

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T'is The Season (Almost)

My latest blog article for "Succeeding in Small Business"

http://www.succeedinginsmallbusiness.com/the-season-is-here-almost-to-choose-holiday-gifts-for-clients-others/


Media Release: Kurn Hattin Singers Selected for Connecticut Valley District Chorus


DATELINE: November 5, 2012
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contacts:
Jaimie Scanlon
Rapt Creative
(W) 802-490-2164 (C) 802-579-8545
jaimie@raptcreative.com

Mark G. Auerbach
Mark G. Auerbach Public Relations
(W) 413-733-7095 (C) 413-427-7352
mgauerbach@gmail.com

Students from Kurn Hattin Homes for Children Selected for Connecticut Valley District VI Chorus

Westminster, Vt.—November, 2012 | Kurn Hattin Homes for Children will be showcasing some of its most talented student singers on Saturday, November 17th at Springfield High School in Vermont.  The eighteen 7th and 8th graders, who auditioned and were selected, became members of the Connecticut Valley District VI Middle School Chorus. District VI is a division of the Vermont Music Educators' Association (VMEA) and serves all public schools in the southeast corner of Vermont.   The students from Kurn Hattin will perform with 65 other student singers from 10 schools throughout Southeastern Vermont.

The middle school performance, conducted by Terry Frey from Barre, Vermont, will take place from 3:00 pm on Saturday, November 17th and will conclude the two-day annual music festival. Kurn Hattin singers are Musa Abdi, Sairy Bernandez, Jahyde Bullard, Brianna Coble, Susanna Compare, D'Leanne Solovei, Dominic Cherbonneau, Spencer DeRose, Logen Dion, Jenitza Fernandez, CJ Hopkins, Amza Issa, Gamael Jean-Francois, Chrystal Longe, JJ Ortiz, Evany Rodriguez, Thomas Taylor, and Connor Towsley.  

Since Kurn Hattin’s inception in 1894, the music program has been an integral part the school’s curriculum. The choir and jazz band host annual invitationals, and the children perform over thirty musical engagements per year. A veteran at Kurn Hattin Homes, music program director Lisa Patno Bianconi has taught at Kurn Hattin Homes since 1985. She is responsible for teaching all general music classes, directing the marching, jazz and concert bands, as well as the beginning, select and advanced student choirs. 

Established in 1894, Kurn Hattin Homes for Children in Westminster, Vermont is a charitable home and school for boys and girls, ages 6-15, who are affected by tragedy, social or economic hardship, or other disruption in family life. Its mission: Kurn Hattin transforms the lives of children and their families forever. www.kurnhattin.org.

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